Program

Keynote Speakers


Cultivating a welcoming free software community that lasts

: Saturday 10:15 - 11:00 EDT (14:15 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Keynote

For forty years, the free software movement has been driven by a passionate community of hackers who care deeply about user freedom and privacy. Meanwhile, the strategies and tools that other software communities use to organize, promote, and execute projects has changed significantly.

In this talk, we will discuss how to cultivate a welcoming community that attracts a new generation of passionate users, contributors, and maintainers to free software projects. I will take inspiration from other successful projects to illustrate a human-centered process that streamlines contributions, strengthens maintainership, and creates a feeling of shared ownership for all users.

David Wilson

David Wilson is a free software developer and video creator residing in thens, Greece. He created the System Crafters channel and community to teach others how to craft their computing experience using free software tools like GNU Emacs and GNU Guix. You can learn more about it at https://systemcrafters.net.



Building bridges and plugging in

: Sunday 10:15 - 11:00 EDT (14:15 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Keynote

Technology policy, and advocacy around it, used to be largely considered in its own silo. Those days are over. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has been lucky to work with advocates in many spaces, including criminal justice, reproductive justice, and worker rights to advocate for change. As technology becomes an integral part of more areas of our daily life, a cross-disciplinary advocacy mindset becomes more necessary to nurture. We will discuss lessons EFF has learned from building these partnerships. We'll highlight how valuable it is for "tech people" to be more involved in modern community movements. We'll also talk about how we can bring skills honed in the free software advocacy community to other areas of policy. Ultimately, the goal is not only to think about how to diversify the free software movement—it's also to expand people's definition of what "counts" as "their" issue.

Hayley Tsukayama

Hayley Tsukayama (she/her) is associate director of legislative activism at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). Her focus is state legislation. She works with EFF's legislative team to craft our positions and public messaging about state bills on EFF issues. She also collaborates with community groups, other policy advocates, and state lawmakers on EFF legislative priorities across the country, including health privacy, surveillance, and right-to-repair. Additionally, she advocates for strong consumer data privacy legislation at the state and national level.


Prior to joining EFF, Hayley spent nearly eight years as a consumer-technology reporter at The Washington Post, writing stories on the industry's largest companies. She is CIPP/US certified by the International Association of Privacy Professionals. She has an MA in journalism from the University of Missouri and a BA in history from Vassar College.



Escape the walled garden: Freeing the Apple GPU

: Sunday 17:00 - 17:45 EDT (21:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Keynote

In 2020, we had free graphics drivers for all major hardware. Enter "Apple Silicon", stage left. The new Macs shipped an in-house GPU with proprietary drivers, no public specs, and no native support for free operating systems. Even worse, the vendor's drivers are not conformant to any industry standard, forcing free software developers to waste time porting their graphics code to run inside the walled garden. What do we do? Reverse-engineer the hardware, of course. Once we dissect the architecture, we can build our own graphics stack, protect software freedom, and beat the big guy with our conformant OpenGL® 4.6 support. In this talk, we'll zoom in on this peculiar GPU and what it means for the fight for free software.

Alyssa Rosenzweig

Alyssa Rosenzweig is the graphics witch behind the reverse-engineered drivers for the Apple GPU. She previously led Panfrost, the free drivers for Arm Mali GPUs powering devices like the Pinebook Pro. She graduated in 2023 with a Computer Science degree from the University of Toronto and now writes free software full-time.


Speakers


Continued: Set up your local currency with free software!

: Sunday 12:15 - 13:00 EDT (16:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Workshop

Taler is a project that develops free software infrastructure for payments. It respects the privacy of buyers while making the income of merchants transparent. Taler does not use the blockchain and it is not a new currency. Instead, it is a building block to deploy bearer-based electronic payments that share some of the properties of traditional cash.

This workshop will cover the design details and talk about the current implementation using GNU Taler: a free software, privacy focused and online payment which is built with some properties of cash.
https://taler.net/en/

Iván Alejandro Ávalos Díaz

I'm a Mexican computer engineer and free-software advocate.



Continued: Connecting community organizations and technological activists for software freedom

: Saturday 12:15 - 13:00 EDT (16:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Workshop

This workshop aims to create an interactive space for free software supporters as well as representatives of community organizations to collaborate and exchange with each others. The participants will share their experiences with working with community organizations. Together, we will brainstorm solutions to bring more technological freedom and independence, privacy and free software collaborative practices into the community sector. I will present the results of a needs assessment postdoctoral project (Fall 2023) in which I interviewed almost 50 Canadian community organizations, listing their technological challenges and needs. We will thinker solutions related to improving community organizations' data management and privacy, collaborative practices, migration to free software platforms, and continuous training.

Christina Haralanova

Christina is an academic researcher, hacker, technical trainer, and founder of Code Cuisine Inc. She has been an active free software supporter since early 2000. In her European practice, she has helped over 30 community organizations and more than 200 persons migrate to free software. In her current practice, Christina is exploring ways to help Canadian community organizations create strategic and sustainable technological practices in their daily usage. Xtina's Master's thesis analyzed the contribution of women in the development of free software development (2010). Her Ph.D. thesis discovered how to transform spaces of hacking to become more pedagogical and accessible to everyone (2019).



Making a libre movie only with libre software

: Sunday 11:15 - 12:00 EDT (15:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Being creative with free software

I made a movie called "Moria's Race" ( an action film about racing-obsessed little children ). It took me 3 and a half years for only about 28 minutes of stuff. But I did it using free software only ( avoided the temptation of rendering on the GPU even ). And the film is released under a CC-BY-SA license.
I can talk about how I made it and what I had to do to manage the project.

J.Y.Amihud (Blender Dumbass )

Born in Ukraine. Jewish. Living in Israel. Raised in a religious family. Not religious now. A fighter for freedom of all humans. A fighter against power of any human.



Raspberry Pi's liberation progress

: Saturday 11:15 - 12:00 EDT (15:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Freedom ladder

This presentation is about Raspberry Pi and the progress on liberating the boot firmware for it. I will talk about why it's important to have free boot firmware on Raspberry Pi and look at its technical details. We will look at the boot firmware librerpi: its status, how it all started and we will also look at its demos.

Johannes Åsgård

I'm Johannes (also known as dolphinana). I'm interested in music and computers. I sometimes compose music and receive positive reactions from it. I like to improvise on piano. As for computers, I like them and I tinker with them sometimes. I have made some attempts to program some games in the past. I'm passionate about free software and I want to contribute to its movement. I try to free the boot firmware on devices when ever possible.



Set up your local currency with free software!

: Sunday 11:15 - 12:00 EDT (15:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Workshop

Taler is a project that develops free software infrastructure for payments. It respects the privacy of buyers while making the income of merchants transparent. Taler does not use the blockchain and it is not a new currency. Instead, it is a building block to deploy bearer-based electronic payments that share some of the properties of traditional cash.

This workshop will cover the design details and talk about the current implementation using GNU Taler: a free software, privacy focused and online payment which is built with some properties of cash.
https://taler.net/en/

Iván Alejandro Ávalos Díaz

I'm a Mexican computer engineer and free-software advocate.



GNU@NU: Building a community in education

: Saturday 14:00 - 14:45 EDT (18:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Community

Nowadays, proprietary/non-free software has become nearly synonymous with educational establishments. Using software that is "the norm" or "industry standard" forces students to submit to proprietary applications "for the good of their future." Tools for textbook access and homework assignment/submission force students to submit to subscription-based DRM models and forfeit any opportunity to own the knowledge contained within the textbooks. Big name companies, some of which are the biggest proponents of proprietary software, are considered the best on resumes, and students are encouraged to search for jobs at such conglomerates. GNU@NU, Northeastern's free software organization is here to help! We will be holding a discussion on student experiences with free software, as they pertain to anything remotely educational. Come join us to help and learn more!

Michael Brodskiy

The Libre Software Advocacy Group at Northeastern University, shortened GNU@NU, is an organization centered around introducing students to the free software philosophy. This is done through workshops, discussions, presentations, guest speakers, and visits to the FSF.


This panel is a cooperation between GNU@NU and Olivia Gallucci, a guest speaker from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Olivia is an offensive security engineer, freelance penetration tester, and security researcher. She is an undergraduate student and ranks in the the top 1% of her class at the Rochester Institute of Technology; Olivia is double-majoring in Cybersecurity and Computer Science, and minoring in Business Administration, Free Software, and Freedom Culture. Additionally, Olivia maintains a blog on security, free software, and productivity. Outside of cybersecurity, Olivia enjoys competitive sailing, anything related to fitness and food, and reading nonfiction.



Hosting freedom: A behind-the-scenes tour with the Savannah Hackers

: Saturday 11:15 - 12:00 EDT (15:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Free software in practice

Wait. GNU/FSF hosts a forge? What's a forge? Who are these hackers? Will there be a quiz later? In this 30 minute talk we'll answer these questions and raises others as we introduce an often overlooked free software development resource and the "smiling faces" behind it.

Corwin Brust

Corwin Brust joined the Savannah Hackers in 2020. He completed his apprenticeship in 2023. He is also a core organizer for EmacsConf and a volunteer for GNU Emacs. His rarely updated blog, where he writes mostly about Emacs, is corwin.bru.st. You can reach him by sending email to corwin@bru.st or in #savannah on https://libera.chat IRC.



Hacking art into a community

: Saturday 12:15 - 13:00 EDT (16:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Freedom ladder

My love for freedom brought me to free software. Free software came with free licenses, like the GPL, that was used for the RepRap project. I have assimilated a lot from that project, and modifying a 3D printer I realized a coreXY meditation table.

Marco Calegaro

Free software hacker.

100% believer in the "Free Software, Free Society" motto.



Lichess: Free chess for everyone forever

: Sunday 15:00 - 15:45 EDT (19:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Free software in practice

Lichess.org is the second biggest chess website in the world with more than 5 million chess games played everyday. Our code is 100% free software, and contains no ads or trackers. Furthermore, it has a strict, and permanent philosophy against paywalls. Users will never pay for access to any feature, or access to any part of the site forever, no exceptions. We’re also not looking for investors and never will be. It is not a small hobby project. We’re one of the largest free software website in the world. How do we pay for it all? It’s easy, our community takes care of everything.

Chris Callahan

Chris Callahan has been a member of the Lichess team since 2016 and served as Lichess community manager since 2018. He performs a variety of roles including hosting AMAs, soliciting user feedback, organizing events, networking with sponsors and more.



AccessKit: A shared accessibility glue layer for the whole community

: Sunday 16:00 - 16:45 EDT (20:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Social context

In non-web applications, accessibility has long been confined to only a handful of the largest, most well-resourced UI toolkits, leaving a large proportion of free software inaccessible to disabled people. AccessKit aims to solve this problem by providing an accessibility abstraction and glue layer that can be reused by many toolkits across programming languages. Our aim is to do for accessibility what libraries such as SDL have done for graphics, input, and windowing. This talk will cover what we've accomplished so far, what's next, and how the community can help.

Matt Campbell

Matt is a visually impaired developer who has been working in accessibility for over 20 years. He spent most of that time so far working on proprietary software, but he is now the lead developer of AccessKit, a free accessibility glue layer for multiple platforms and programming languages.



Empowering youth in the digital age: A path to success

: Saturday 15:00 - 15:45 EDT (19:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Education

In this presentation we try to show the work that we do in our hackerspace taking out of the social risk kids and youngsters and showing them how a healthy use of the internet and technology can bring new horizons not only to adult life , but constructing a career trough the knowing about programming, robotics, free software, and cyber security. Also teaching then how to protect their selves and their data online.

Leonardo Champion

It analyst with more then fifteen years on the market, hacktivist free software enthusiast, almost a researcher for new technologies but with social responsibility, a defender of freedom of speech, thought, and a fighter for data privacy politics.



Exploring free software entrepreneurship: Navigating the opportunities and obstacles

: Saturday 15:00 - 15:45 EDT (19:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Social context

Free software entrepreneurship offers a wealth of opportunities, from reduced barriers to entry to community collaboration and market expansion; however, it comes with its set of obstacles, including monetization challenges, licensing complexities, competition, community management, and ongoing maintenance. How to establish a successful free software business by empowering customers with freedom, self-sustenance, and complete control, and at the same time explore business opportunities.

Shivanand Edrami

I bring to the table 25 years of experience in various domains, such as sales, marketing, business development, and management. My primary focus is on assisting and providing consultancy services to clients in selecting the most suitable free software solutions, allowing them to self-host their IT infrastructure, thereby granting them complete autonomy and control over their IT systems.



Digital freedom as a moral imperative for authors

: Saturday 16:00 - 16:45 EDT (20:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Licensing

Today, the market embraces "open source" as a pragmatic working model, but does not have libre software as an ethical imperative.

The companies that produce the most libre works are companies with proprietary business models, while many useful libre projects struggle to find funding, up to the point of ending up with no maintenance, bought by proprietary producers or transitioning to proprietary licensing models.

If the long-term maintenance of libre projects is only sustainable for those who produce proprietary works, how will we be ever able to overcome the proprietary model?

On this panel, we will discuss strategies to overcome the proprietary model for good, and make libre works an achievable moral imperative for most authors.

Felix Freeman

Felix Freeman is a web developer, GNU/Linux sysadmin, software engineer, and activist who specializes in libre software. Co-founder of Hackerspace Santiago (hackerspace.cl) and the "Escuela de Técnica y Cultura Hacker" (hacktivista.org). Felix has been active in the libre software community for more than fifteen years.



Resurrecting Software Freedom Day

: Sunday 12:15 - 13:00 EDT (16:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Social context

Software Freedom Day has been a rather niche event, but inside the FOSS community it was a household brand a decade ago. While it has been on the decline over the last 10 years, today the event is more important than ever in the movement to further Software Freedom. In this talk, I will explain why.

Jurgen Gaeremyn

Father of two, happily married, bit of a nerd, but not a die hard technical profile. A bit of a philosopher but not a trained scholar. Long time user and advocate of entry level free software tools. Part of the Digital Freedom Foundation Board



Connecting community organizations and technological activists for software freedom

: Saturday 11:15 - 12:00 EDT (15:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Workshop

This workshop aims to create an interactive space for free software supporters as well as representatives of community organizations to collaborate and exchange with each others. The participants will share their experiences with working with community organizations. Together, we will brainstorm solutions to bring more technological freedom and independence, privacy and free software collaborative practices into the community sector. I will present the results of a needs assessment postdoctoral project (Fall 2023) in which I interviewed almost 50 Canadian community organizations, listing their technological challenges and needs. We will thinker solutions related to improving community organizations' data management and privacy, collaborative practices, migration to free software platforms, and continuous training.

Christina Haralanova

Christina is an academic researcher, hacker, technical trainer, and founder of Code Cuisine Inc. She has been an active free software supporter since early 2000. In her European practice, she has helped over 30 community organizations and more than 200 persons migrate to free software. In her current practice, Christina is exploring ways to help Canadian community organizations create strategic and sustainable technological practices in their daily usage. Xtina's Master's thesis analyzed the contribution of women in the development of free software development (2010). Her Ph.D. thesis discovered how to transform spaces of hacking to become more pedagogical and accessible to everyone (2019).



"Artificial intelligence": What threat are we talking about?

: Saturday 14:00 - 14:45 EDT (18:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Exploring free software concepts

Various distinguished and international newspapers are announcing that AI will have a disruptive impact on employment, various governments seem to be partly aware of the impact for better or worse of this technology on society. The Center for AI Safety which aims to "ensure the safe development and use of AI" publishes "Mitigating the risk of extinction caused by AI should be a global priority, along with other societal-scale risks such as pandemics and nuclear war." We will connect the dots between investments in AI and previous investments made by Silicon Valley and try to decipher the trends and risks. Above all, we will reflect on how this relates to those of us who are passionate about sharing, the commons, and free software.

Roberto Innocenti

Among the founders of the project Open Hardware PowerPC Notebook, presenter and ambassador of the project. President of the association Power Progress Community which deals with the promotion and dissemination of free software and libre hardware. Responsible in humanist forums of the area "Technology for improving the living conditions of mankind". By profession, Software architect with free software tools.



Steadfast self-hosting

: Sunday 16:00 - 16:45 EDT (20:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Security

Your data are essential to your life, your agency, and your future. Come learn how to save, serve, and safely share your data at home with a smorgasbord of free software. I'll cover rapid setup and basic use of tools such as Traefik, Nextcloud, Wallabag, Jellyfin, and more. With these powerful and private services at your disposal, you can collaboratively edit documents in realtime online, stream music and video, and future-proof your digital assets.

This talk pairs well with a soon-to-be released book of the same topic and title. Both the book and talk are about self-hosting free software, were created with free software, and are free software themselves.

Adam Monsen

Adam is a father, tech entrepreneur, and free software enthusiast. He loves to parent, care, laugh, sing, listen, code, build, produce, debug, architect, debug, lead, manage, debug some more, lecture, and write. He's good at administering and securing systems and processes while ensuring privacy, compliance, and reliability. Adam is most proud of his family, growing Mifos, founding SeaGL, selling C-SATS, and writing his book.



Free software legislation: How we win

: Saturday 15:00 - 15:45 EDT (19:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Free software in government

In many contexts, including cybersecurity and AI, governments around the world are working on legislation to regulate the distribution of software. The presentation will look at how we've addressed external problems in the past. The ones we won, the ones we lost. It will look at a year of work on the EU Cyber Resilience Act. First, a short look at its substance, because the US and other regions are already working on something similar. Second, a longer look at the campaign itself: coalition building, why policy can't be worked on like software, and how to find and keep allies.

Ciarán O'Riordan

Senior policy advisor at OFE, Ciarán O’Riordan has been working in Brussels since 2004 with a focus on EU policy and free software. His work in the sector includes copyright and patent policy in the EU, patent policy in the US, and community engagement for the drafting of version 3 of the GNU General Public License. He also brings policy experience from the automotive sector, GDPR, and corporate finance. He studied law at UCLouvain Saint-Louis Bruxelles. A user of GNU/Linux since 1998, Ciarán worked as a software developer in Dublin before his move to Brussels.



Software enshittification or freedom? It's not a hard choice!

: Sunday 14:00 - 14:45 EDT (18:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Exploring free software concepts

Nonfree software subjugates users. That's wrong enough, but such power is now used to wrong users even harder. The easier it is for third parties to impose on a user their choice of software version the more they can twiddle the software's behavior to best serve themselves and enshittify the user's computing. This holds for dominant (nonfree) operating systems for workstations and mobiles, with their mandatory updates, but users become even more vulnerable to enshittification by using web apps downloaded at every use from somebody else's servers, by doing their computing through somebody else's services, and by using remotely controlled and remotely mediated smartIoT devices and appliances. Even when using software that's not updated automatically on their own computers, users (and their upstream distributors) may be persuaded to adopt enshittif(ied/ying?) versions, including CPU microcode and firmware for system initialization and for peripheral devices. Is using free software enough to escape?

Alexandre Oliva

Free software evangelist. GNU speaker and advisory-committee member. Recipient of the FSF's 2016 Award for the Advancement of Free Software. FSF Latin America board member. FSF supporter, voting member, and former acting president. LibrePlanet São Paulo activist. 0G foreseer. Maintainer of GNU Linux-libre, and co-maintainer of the GNU Compiler Collection, GNU binutils, and GNU libc. Libre-SOC contributor. GNU tools engineer at AdaCore.



Empowering Africa: Free software as a solution to Big Tech dominance

: Sunday 14:00 - 14:45 EDT (18:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Licensing

Join me in a transformative exploration of free software's role in empowering communities and fostering change. As a law graduate, software developer, community leader, teacher, and business owner, I bring a unique perspective to the intersection of law, technology, and social impact. I'll delve into the legal intricacies of free software, sharing insights into licenses and intellectual property rights. Through real-world examples, I'll showcase the pivotal role of free software in education, entrepreneurship, and social good initiatives. Together, we'll discuss strategies for building inclusive tech communities, ensuring privacy, and harnessing free software for positive societal change. Let's embark on a journey to harness the power of free software for a better, more equitable world.

Crescent Omeje

Crescent is a passionate advocate for free software technology, law, and community empowerment. With a background in law, Crescent bridges the gap between legal complexities and the free software world. As a dedicated software developer, community leader, and educator, he has cultivated a unique perspective on the intersection of law, technology, and education.


Crescent is not just a law graduate but also a dynamic software developer, weaving innovative solutions and community-driven projects. He brings a wealth of experience from his role as a teacher, fostering the next generation of tech enthusiasts.


As a committed free software advocate, Crescent understands the transformative power of collaborative, transparent, and inclusive technology. He also navigates the business landscape as an entrepreneur, finding the balance between free software ideals and entrepreneurial ventures.


With a genuine passion for sharing knowledge and fostering dialogue, Crescent actively engages in public forums, advocating for free software principles and community growth. His diverse background and multifaceted expertise make him a valuable asset in any discussion about the future of free software technology.



Writing free culture fantasy with free software

: Saturday 16:00 - 16:45 EDT (20:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Being creative with free software

The collaborative spirit of the free software and hacker movements lends itself to writing fiction as well. I write free culture fantasy stories with free software tools. Crafting characters and settings that can be used freely by other authors and artists promotes creativity and is a useful way of teaching people about the principles of freedom.

Since I use plain text and a Git-based workflow, anyone can freely read, modify, and share my stories. They can learn from edits I have made or propose improvements. Plain text formats like Markdown and Shanty make writings portable across most computers.

We can create a storytelling community that allows cross-pollination between creators and disciplines (e.g., novels, songs, and video games) and changes us from consumers to creators.

Seth Patterson

Seth Patterson grew up listening to radio dramas and his mom reading novels from the 1800s. He got his love of writing from his dad, who is an editor. In high school, he completed One Year Adventure Novel. He has been in love with writing fiction ever since.


He studied cybersecurity in college, which taught him how to think like bad guys to defend against them. Thinking like bad guys comes in handy for writing fiction too. He also discovered free software and free culture in college.


Seth writes free culture fiction, using tools like Nano and Markdown.



Gaming on a Talos II: How I avoid using Steam

: Sunday 14:00 - 14:45 EDT (18:00 UTC)
: Neptune -- online
: Free software in practice

It is well known that Valve distributes non-free DRMed games via their Steam Platform, including many VR games. As a gamer who cares about freedom, I avoid those games. Since my computer is based on the FSF certified Talos II Mainboard and POWER9 CPU, I'm technically unable to install those non-free games and the Steam Client Software. Instead I go for Freedom-To-Play games, included in many GNU/Linux distributions. (in some cases even SteamOS without having to use Steam). I'll also improve existing "open source" games and make them truly freedom respecting. This does not mean that those games have to be gratis, I think of a way to enable users to pay for Freedom-To-Play games using Taler.

Tobias Platen

I'm a free software developer, HDL engineer and passionate VR gamer. I have been using free software for many years, the first time I used GNU software (not knowing about GNUs freedom) was GNUchess for 16 Bit Windows in 1994.



GNU/Linux in the high school classroom

: Sunday 12:15 - 13:00 EDT (16:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Education

Learn how I use GNU/Linux in my classroom. See how students use the Command Line Interface (CLI) to perform network exploration tasks. Lessons on Bash and Python coding will also be discussed. There will also be examination of emerging trends in high school computer science.

Neil Plotnick

Nationally recognized, American high school teacher with over two decades of classroom experience. Previously worked for fifteen years in information technology for Ziff-Davis, including PC Week, where he wrote a networking advice column. His book "The IT Professionals Guide" was published by McGraw Hill.



Walled gardens of freedom

: Saturday 16:00 - 16:45 EDT (20:00 UTC)
: Saturn -- in-person
: Free software in practice

The primary computer for over half of humanity is the smartphone. Nearly all of these devices run some proprietary locked-down derivations of free operating systems that restrict, in various ways, the software that can be run. The resulting "walled garden" app stores that dominate these platforms are naturally biased against free software in favor of profit-making app ventures. Does this mean that free software is impossible to create – and sustain – in this environment? The premise of this talk is that the answer must be no. But it is an uphill battle. I will outline a model of an oasis of free software that can grow and thrive within these walled-garden environments, and how a small global community can sustain a collection of digital public goods that may benefit billions of people, with minimal ongoing cost, for generations to come.

Marc Prud'hommeaux

I've been programming computers since 1983, starting with a TRS-80. I've developed both enterprise and consumer software on a wide range of platforms since 1998. I've worked on some popular apps, such as the Stanza ebook reader for the iPhone, and subsequent contribution to the Kindle app. I recently founded the App Fair Project to promote free software for mobile devices as digital public goods.



Free software praxis: Removing limitations

: Sunday 16:00 - 16:45 EDT (20:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Freedom ladder

Using OpenProject as an example, this talk explores how to delve into a completely alien codebase written in a language that you've never used to make changes that you want. This is a practical use of software freedom.

We will walk through all the steps from "I just installed this software" all the way through becoming familiar with the codebase and developing an understanding of the language. On the way we will discuss when it makes sense to take shortcuts and when it makes sense to actually do the hard work. We'll end with a live demo.

Romeo S

Coming all the way from the other end of I-90, I am a GNU/Linux sysadmin with nearly a decade of experience. As a college dropout, I have taught myself the ins and outs of GNU/Linux and of numerous software projects. A consistent habit of "being the edge case that you want to see in the world" has forced me to develop a knack for solving problems that developers and maintainers typically don't see coming. Primarily specializing in HPC-related infrastructure management, I live in a world of "except for on this cluster" and "except for in this context." This environment of asterisks has forced adaptability, which has translated into a lot of experience in diving into the weeds.



It is easy to contribute to GNU

: Saturday 12:15 - 13:00 EDT (16:00 UTC)
: Jupiter -- in-person
: Community

This presentation starts with a brief introduction of how I became a Savannah user in 2014 and began my road to contribute to GNU website translations in 2017. The whole experience is an interesting journey. I think many people can do this because GNU has forty years of history already. All the tools are good enough for you to contribute.

Wensheng XIE

I am an associate member of the FSF and have been coordinating the GNU website's Simplified Chinese Translation project since 2017.